#7 If You Build It, They Will Come

if you build it
#7 If You Build It, They Will Come #outofthesnares

How many of you have seen the movie “Field of Dreams”

Iowa farmer Ray Kinsella hears a voice in his corn field tell him, “If you build it, he will come.” He interprets this message as an instruction to build a baseball field on his farm, upon which appear the ghosts of Shoeless Joe Jackson and the other seven Chicago White Sox players banned from the game for throwing the 1919 World Series. When the voices continue, Ray seeks out a reclusive author to help him understand the meaning of the messages and the purpose for his field.

All his life, Ray Kinsella was searching for his dreams. Then one day, his dreams came looking for him.

If you believe the impossible, the incredible can come true.

If you build it, they will come.

Here are a few men who “Built it and they came”
Steve Jobs built Apple computers
Henry Ford built the 8-cylinder engine
Edison built the light bulb.

These are just a few examples of men who dared to dream and build something that would serve others.

But this phrase does not only apply to baseball fields and technology.
Anything you build, they will come
.
Translation, “whatever your plant will grow.”

Whatever you put your attention on, increases.

What is your field of dreams?

What are the voices in your dreams telling you to build?

if you build it 2

In my book “Out of the Snares” my field was “my promised land”

The voices in my dreams kept telling me that if I built on this land, I would leave a Legacy for my children.

I have internalized this phrase. It has become my truth. I know…without a shadow of doubt, “that if I build it, they will come.” Anything I build, they will come.
As a Life coach and motivational speaker, I am building my business now. I build my brand on LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram, Facebook. I blog several times per month. I have authored 3 books.

http://myhelps.us/books/

This is how I am building, and they are coming.

Here is an excerpt from a blog about the mother of a Downs Syndrome child who wanted to attend college. The College had to build a program for inclusion of special needs students. They built it, and the students came.
http://kellehampton.com/2015/03/if-you-build-it-they-will-come-if-you.html

Several years ago, a young woman attending a special needs graduate course there piped up at the end of class and asked her professor, “What is this college doing for inclusion?” The professor thought a moment and then turned it into a homework assignment (“The other students hated me,” she laughed.): Design and write out what you think a college program for special needs should look like. If Field of Dreams taught us anything… If you build it, they will come. The students designed what became the University Participant (UP) Program, a fully inclusive 2-year program–full residence, dorms, classes, work, support, communication, goals, accountability–and soon found one student with special needs who wanted to come. “We were building the airplane as we were flying it,” Dr. Kelly Kelley remembers. “So you built it,” I asked, “but how did you fund it?” “Passion,” she quickly answered. Speaking of passion, let me explain how I landed in North Carolina last week. Right before Nella’s birthday this year, I received an e-mail from Liz, another mom of a little girl with Down syndrome. I had written a post expressing interest in organizations helping adults with Down syndrome, specifically in relation to post-secondary educational opportunities. Liz responded, telling me about Ruby’s Rainbow, the organization she and her husband had just started in 2011, providing scholarships for people with Down syndrome to attend college. In four years, Ruby’s Rainbow has already helped fund 42 people’s college dreams. The thing is, a lot of people don’t realize that “people with Down syndrome attending college” is even a phrase. And how can we raise money for it if people don’t know it exists? I wanted to help bring attention to the incredible work Liz and Ruby’s Rainbow is doing, but I was also curious–what does this even look like? One phone call with Liz, and we were scheming. Let’s go to college. Let’s go visit two Ruby’s Rainbow scholarship recipients and let them tell the story. Let’s peek into the window of possibilities for our own girls. Let’s see what can happen when one person begins with a question: “What are we doing to help? “ Thanks to an incredibly accommodating college that quickly set up a full day’s agenda to give us a thorough day-in-the-life experience, and two individuals who were eager to share their story with us, we were on our way early Wednesday morning last week to make the two-hour drive from our hotel to Cullowhee, North Carolina. Our first stop: The Office of Residential Living where Zach gets paid to work 10 hours a week as an office assistant to supplement his college experience. A handsome young man, sharply dressed, stepped away from his computer to greet us when we arrived. He shook our hands and introduced himself, answered our questions about what he does and paused to answer the phone when it rang or tend to the front desk when his officemate asked for help. –
See more at: http://kellehampton.com/2015/03/if-you-build-it-they-will-come-if-you.html#sthash.8LkIdX0n.dpuf

Now some of you know that sometimes, okay most times, especially for startup companies “You build it, they do Not come.”

This article talks about Entrepreneurship and building a new company.
http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/251900

Sometimes you have to go get the clients instead of waiting for them to come.
Here is an excerpt:.
I am not sure my version of this quote would have worked for Kevin Costner and the movie Field of Dreams, but it would certainly have saved countless entrepreneurs from disappointment and defeat.
There’s no shortage of savvy startups that will never get off the ground or designer duds that won’t grace the catwalk. Just because a product is out there doesn’t guarantee that consumers will come. Great ideas without equally great promotion are as good as non-existent.
It’s just like the age old question: If a tree falls in a forest and no one is around to hear it, does it still make a sound? The same can be said for great ideas and products. If consumers never discover or buy them, are they still great? I have fallen victim to the false pretense that if I only built something, consumers would come right over and consume it. But my first failed business taught me otherwise.
At the ripe old age of 21, I managed to convince two successful entrepreneurs — after multiple pitch meetings and business plan revisions — to invest in my media company, despite the fact that I knew nearly nothing about media.
What I wanted was to create the leading online men’s lifestyle magazine, complete with highlights on where to eat, what to wear, where to travel — and I called it Debonair. The idea was much more novel in the early 2000’s before the flood of publications now devoted to gents — and the idea was good (Thrillist and Urban Daddy launched similarly oriented sites shortly after to much success).
They wrote me a check for $100,000 and just like that I was in business. But contrary to my mistaken notion, it wasn’t as simple as having the seed money, building the site and just watching everything fall into place. I wasn’t popping champagne and toasting with the big boys like I thought I’d be. Not even close. The next two years were trying times, and I was swimming in a sea of startups that knew more than I did.
I poured every dollar I had into a fancy website with what I believed were all the right bells and whistles and pricey photography that had made glossy magazines so sought after and I figured that was all it would take. When the traffic didn’t come, I blamed it on the site design, the logo, the font, the layout, the photos. I became victim to the “better is the enemy of best” syndrome, redoing the same thing over and over and over again trying to perfect it for the public. By the time I bypassed the fluff changes and figured out search engine optimization, pay-per-click, buying lists and marketing — it was too late.
I lost every last cent of my seed money, and Debonair flopped.
I built it, and they did not come.
……..
Five years later, I tried again. This time with Sourcing Journal, a trade publication.
Unless your jeans have three legs, it isn’t a new idea. If you want to build a brand, build it. Forget the wealthy heirs to family businesses or those who get large venture capital funding. If that isn’t you, like it wasn’t me, you will have to be a doer and figure it out. Go get some orders, no matter what product you have. Borrow money for purchase order financing to produce the product and pay the too-high rates if need be. Be scrappy, be an entrepreneur, make it happen.
Focus on distribution. Technology has changed the game, so use it to help get the word out there, build hype and sell, sell, sell. Do not wait for the people to come because you could be waiting a long time. Knock down the proverbial door and keep going. And when you get that order from Barneys, or Macy’s or Bed Bath and Beyond, call me. I’d be happy to make that product for you.
Not because you built it, but because you got them to come.

Edward Hertzman
CONTRIBUTOR
Founder of Sourcing Journal

Here Are Five Reasons That If You Build It, They Will Come.

1. Make sure that there is a need for what you are building. If you are a startup company. Do your research, know the demographics of your target market.
2. Be prepared to keep at it until you win. If something does not work, change your approach. If that does not work, change it again. Keep changing your approach until you win. There is a winning solution! Most people give up when success is just around the corner.
3. You must see the vision. If you don’t see it, you can never be positive that you will win. It will be like a pie in the sky. Something hoped for, but unattainable.
4. You must have a burning desire to win. You live the phrase “failure is not an option.” The desire must consume you. There is no better example of this than the Sylvester Stallone story. Sylvester refused $100,000 for his script “Rocky” when he had no money to eat. He then sold his dog for $50.00 to buy food. His burning desire was to star in his screen play. He built it and they came!
5. Keep hitting the Anvil. Do something every day that brings you closer to your “field of dreams.”

15 Benefits of #Business #Coaching

business coach

Business coaching for start-up companies that are experiencing sluggish growth helps these companies increase the bottom line, reduce attrition and create happier employees. As a Business and Success Coach, based in South Florida, MyHelps Inc launches new programs to help entrepreneurs achieve these goals.

Coaching, while this word comes from sports where the coach assists individuals as well as teams to increase performance and achieve new goals, is a process in which the coach asks the individual well-formulated questions and helps in finding answers.

The strongest aspect of coaching is that the individual is finding answers to his or her own questions. Simultaneously it is perceived as a managerial approach and style of management where the manager himself becomes the coach of employees.

Business Leaders have identified fifteen significant benefits of Business coaching as a growth and development tool.

They are:
1. Continuous one-on-one attention that facilitates growth
2. Expanded thinking through dialogue and powerful questioning from a coach.
3. Self-awareness – including bringing light to blind spots.
4. Personal accountability for development – A coach can hold you accountable for work you promised to do.
5. Just-in-time learning; e.g. preparing for a speech or meeting
6. Sustained interpersonal skills development.
7. Consistent, long-term development that gets embedded and becomes part of your routine.
8. Identify executive strengths and development needs
9. Leverage existing strengths and improve performance
10. Create a Leadership Strategy with an Action Plan and accountability to help Business owners stay on track
11. Adopt and/or reinforce the required leadership skills and competencies crucial to the company’s growth.
12. Positive and sustainable behavior changes
13. Develop leadership skills and practices; learn coaching skills they can implement.
14. Enhanced career planning and development with an action-oriented plan
15. Create and plan for greater work/life balance.

Myrna Morris Young (@myrna_morris) is the president and owner of MyHelps Inc, a Florida based Coaching and Consulting firm that specializes in delivering leadership development programs for start-up companies and dynamic organizations.
Ms Young is a Certified Professional Coach from the University of Miami, Credentialed as an Associate Certified Coach by the International Coaching Federation, Awarded Entrepreneur of the Year in 1998 and nominated for Business Woman of the Year in 2015. Her areas of expertise are Leadership development, social media marketing and personal growth. Myrna can be reached for your coaching requirements or as a motivational speaker for your next event at 888-569-3182 or on the web at “http://www.myhelps.us”

WHAT IS YOUR STARTUP IQ?

startupiq
Are you an Entrepreneur or thinking of becoming an Entrepreneur? Would you like to know if you are naturally gifted with Entrepreneurship Intelligence or you will have to work harder than most? Silicon Valley have the answer for you.

A test for success:

Here are a few natural traits that predict Entrepreneurial success:

startup

Openness – A high openness score means you are open minded. You listen to the ideas of others and are willing to learn from them. Sam Walton built the Walmart Empire by learning from his competitors.

• Conscientiousness – Doing what is right. Integrity and honesty fit into this natural ability as well. Conscientious Entrepreneurs run their companies diligently, solving their customers problems.

• Extraversion – We have heard a lot about extroversion as it relates to successful CEO’s. True in order to sell, you must like people and be comfortable around them; but as an Entrepreneur you shouldn’t go it alone. You should create a team. If you are not a natural extrovert, hire a front line sales person. Bill Gates is an introvert so you could be wildly successful even if you don’t have this natural ability.

• Agreeableness – Are you compassionate, warm and considerate? People do business with people they like. Agreeableness does not mean you must be nice all the time. As a business owner you must be able to also be straightforward with customers and employees and to replace the ones who do not conform to your mission.

• Neuroticism – A good indication of Entrepreneurial success is to score low on the neuroticism test. Neuroticism is defined as the tendency of an individual to experience negative emotions such as anxiety, hostility, depression, impulsiveness and vulnerability. Entrepreneurs, Managers and Leaders must be emotionally stable, self-confident, calm in the presence of chaos, even tempered and relaxed.

• Fluid Intelligence – This refers to the ability to rapidly learn and apply a rule. Entrepreneurs deal with different issues all day. As a start-up they wear many different hats. The ability to switch from one issue to another is very important and is a skill that cannot be learned. Fluid Intelligence is considered the most revealing test for success. If you get stuck and can’t switch roles, you cannot lead and become an Enterprise.

I open this up for comments if anyone disagrees with Silicon Valley. As an Entrepreneur, I agree with this predictive test.

As your Success and Entrepreneurial Coach, the foundation of my coaching practice is creating self-awareness and business consciousness. I have seen passion override natural ability; so go for it.